Cushion Cover 40cm Damien and Yilpi Marks Red Ochre

$65.95

Brand: BETTER WORLD ARTS

Availability: In Stock

Artist: Damien and Yilpi Marks. This is a teaching painting, describing a dry season in Damien's homeland, Mount Liebig, in the Northern Territory. It illustrates aspects of landscape and culture that was told to Damien by his great-grandparents. Women sit with children collecting bush potatoes (the red shapes at the top of the painting) and are preparing for inma (ceremony). One man, wati, sits down with his waru (spear). Controlled burnings are taking place as the spinifex is dry, and this means good fruits can grow. The small star-like symbols represent womens body paint that the women paint on each other for inma. A dry creekbed runs through the painting (in red and white), and there are cracks in the claypans, dried rockholes (tjukula), and sandhills (tali). These beautiful, unique textiles are a cross-cultural collaboration combining Aboriginal designs and traditional Kashmiri rug-making techniques. Chain stitched, using hand dyed wool, each is a completely handmade piece. Purchase of these products guarantees a direct return to the Aboriginal artist and their community. As these products are handmade, there maybe minor variations in dye and design. NOTE: Does not include insert.

SKU: 1010B


Artist: Damien and Yilpi Marks. This is a teaching painting, describing a dry season in Damien's homeland, Mount Liebig, in the Northern Territory. It illustrates aspects of landscape and culture that was told to Damien by his great-grandparents. Women sit with children collecting bush potatoes (the red shapes at the top of the painting) and are preparing for inma (ceremony). One man, wati, sits down with his waru (spear). Controlled burnings are taking place as the spinifex is dry, and this means good fruits can grow. The small star-like symbols represent womens body paint that the women paint on each other for inma. A dry creekbed runs through the painting (in red and white), and there are cracks in the claypans, dried rockholes (tjukula), and sandhills (tali).
 
These beautiful, unique textiles are a cross-cultural collaboration combining Aboriginal designs and traditional Kashmiri rug-making techniques. Chain stitched, using hand dyed wool, each is a completely handmade piece. Purchase of these products guarantees a direct return to the Aboriginal artist and their community. As these products are handmade, there maybe minor variations in dye and design. NOTE: Does not include insert.

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